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District Advancement

Merit Badge Counselor Applications - New: theMerit Badge Counselor Information sheet has been revised and can now be filled out online (http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/34405.pdf).

 

Advancement: NEW Guide to Advancement (2013 printing)

Advancement Guides, Policies, etc.: BSA Advancement Resources Page

Advancement Chair: Richard Potts
Eagle Advancement: Greg Thurlow  
Scheduling Eagle Scout Boards of Review: Ken Birmingham

Special note to all Unit Advancement Chairs here. Support Document 1. Support Document 2.

Cub Scout Advancement

Advancement is the process by which a boy progresses from badge to badge, learning new skills as he goes. The Cub Scout advancement program is designed to encourage the natural interests of a boy in a natural way. Each of the ranks and awards in Cub Scouting has its own requirements. As a boy advances through the ranks, requirements are progressively more challenging, matching the increased skills and abilities of a boy as he grows older.

Advancement is one of the methods used to achieve Scouting's aims—character development, citizenship training, and personal fitness. Everything a Cub Scout does to advance is designed to achieve these aims and aid in his personal growth. These badges are a means to an end—not an end in themselves.


Bobcat

No matter what age or grade a boy joins Cub Scouting, he must earn his Bobcat badge before he can advance to the rank of Tiger Cub, Wolf, Bear, or Webelos. A boy must complete the Bobcat requirements, which include demonstrating his understanding of Scouting's core values. He must be able to recite the Cub Scout Promise, Law of the Pack, and motto and demonstrate the Cub Scout sign, handshake, and salute. He must also explain what each of these ideals means, in addition to demonstrating his understanding of the core values of honesty and trustworthiness, and explaining their importance.

 


Tiger Cub

To begin his path to the Tiger Cub rank, the Tiger Cub (age 7) must learn the Cub Scout promise, the Cub Scout sign, and the Cub Scout salute. When he has accomplished these tasks, he will be awarded his Tiger Cub immediate recognition emblem. This is a tiger paw with four strands for beads that he wears on the right pocket.

As a boy completes each part of the achievements, he will be awarded either an orange (den activities), white (family activities), or black ("Go See It") bead. When the boy has earned five beads of each color, he is eligible to receive his Tiger Cub badge. The Tiger Cub badge is presented to the adult partner at the next pack meeting. In an impressive ceremony, the adult partner in turn presents the badge to the boy.

 


Wolf

The Wolf rank is for boys who have completed first grade (or who are 8 years old). To earn the Wolf badge, a boy must pass 12 achievements involving simple physical and mental skills. His parent or guardian approves each achievement by signing his book. When all requirements are satisfied, the Wolf badge is presented to his parent or guardian at the next pack meeting in an impressive advancement ceremony, during which the parent or guardian in turn presents the badge to the boy.

After he has earned the Wolf badge, a boy is encouraged to work on the 22 Wolf electives until he completes second grade (or turns 9 years old). More than 100 elective projects are aimed at kindling his interest in new hobbies, as well as teaching him skills that will be useful during his Boy Scout years. When he completes 10 elective projects, he earns a Gold Arrow Point to wear under the Wolf badge. For each additional 10 elective projects completed, he earns a Silver Arrow Point.

 


Bear

The Bear rank is for boys who have completed second grade (or are 9 years old). There are 24 Bear achievements in four categories; boys must complete 12 of these to earn the Bear badge. These requirements are more difficult and challenging than those for the Wolf badge. When the boy has earned his Bear badge, he may work on electives for credit toward Arrow Points to be worn under the Bear badge.

 


Webelos

Webelos dens are for boys who have completed third grade (or reached age 10). The Webelos den program is different from the Cub Scout den program: Instead of being based on a monthly theme, the Webelos den program is based on one of 20 Webelos activities:

Physical Skills

  • Aquanaut
  • Athlete
  • Fitness
  • Sportsman

Mental Skills

  • Artist
  • Scholar
  • Showman
  • Traveler

Community

  • Citizen
  • Communicator
  • Family Member
  • Readyman

Technology

  • Craftsman
  • Engineer
  • Handyman
  • Scientist

Outdoor Activity

  • Forester
  • Geologist
  • Naturalist
  • Outdoorsman

Webelos Scouts work on requirements during their weekly den meetings. Once the boy learns the skill, he practices it at den meetings and at home on his own. The boy's family is encouraged to help him at home. Boys bring to den meetings completed or partially completed projects done at home to show others, as well as to be approved by the Webelos den leader. This sharing encourages a boy to do his best and helps to build his confidence and self-esteem.

When a boy has completed the requirements for an activity badge, the Webelos den leader or activity badge counselor, rather than a parent, approves most of the activity badges.

In addition to earning individual activity pins, Webelos Scouts can earn the compass points emblem, which is awarded after earning seven activity badges. Metal compass points—east, west, north, and south—are awarded for each four additional activity badges earned.

 


Arrow of Light

The pinnacle of Cub Scouting is the Arrow of Light Award. The requirements for this badge include developing outdoor skills, gaining an understanding of the values of Scouting, and preparing to become a Boy Scout.

This recognition is the only Cub Scout badge that can be worn on the Boy Scout uniform when a boy graduates into a troop. Adult leaders who earned the Arrow of Light as a youth may also wear the appropriate square knot on their adult uniform. Webelos Scouts who have earned the Arrow of Light Award have also completed all requirements for the Boy Scout badge. 

 

 Boy Scout Advancement

Rank Advancement
Boy Scouting provides a series of surmountable obstacles and steps in overcoming them through the advancement method. The Boy Scout plans his advancement and progresses at his own pace as he meets each challenge. The Boy Scout is rewarded for each achievement, which helps him gain self-confidence. The steps in the advancement system help a Boy Scout grow in self-reliance and in the ability to help others.

Scout Rank
The first rank of Boy Scouting can be earned as soon as a boy joins a troop, especially if he has earned his Arrow of Light as a Webelos Scout. This first rank is earned by applying and memorizing some important scouting basics. Some troops have Webelos Scouts bridge over from the Pack to the Troop in February at their Cub Scout Pack Blue and Gold dinner and then have a Court of Honor in March or April where they are presented with their Scout badge.

Tenderfoot Rank
Tenderfoot is the first rank earned as a Boy Scout. The requirements of becoming a Tenderfoot provide basic skills to begin preparing the Scout for higher adventure outings. Earning badges and receiving recognition can be very satisfying to boys. However, keep in mind that the badge is only a representation of a valuable set of skills that a scout has learned and demonstrated. The skills, wisdom, and experience gained through the activities of the scouting program are of much more value than a small badge.

View Tenderfoot Rank Advancement Videos
Be sure to click on the Tenderfoot icon then Requirement #1 to start the videos.  

Go here to see available Advancement Helps for Tenderfoot

Second Class Rank
Second Class Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A Second Class Scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

View Second Class Rank Advancement Videos
Be sure to click on the Second Class icon then Requirement #1 to start the videos.

Go here to see available Advancement Helps for Second Class

First Class Rank
When the First Class rank is attained, a Scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class Sscout is prepared.

View First Class Rank Advancement Videos
Be sure to click on the First Class icon then Requirement #1 to start the videos.

Go here for to see available Advance Helps for First Class

Star Rank
Up through First Class rank, a scout was busy learning skills and becoming a self-sufficient scout. He now moves from being a learner to being a leader. The Star rank is attained with participation, leadership, service, and self-directed advancement through merit badges.

 


Life Rank
Continuing to develop leadership skills, the Life Scout rank is earned by fulfilling additional leadership positions, service hours, and merit badges. A Life Scout is expected to be a role model and leader in the troop, providing guidance to new scouts and helping the troop however he can. Being a good leader can only be learned by doing and troop leadership positions allow the scout to make decisions, lead discussions, and encourage others.

  • Here's a great website dedicated to helping Scouts advance from the Life rank to to Eagle!  www.Eaglescout.org

Eagle Rank
Attaining the Eagle rank is often the end goal of a Scout and his parents. It shows commitment to a program over an extended span of time. But, just like each rank advancement before it, the Eagle rank is a major advancement milestone, but not the culmination of scouting. After reaching Eagle, a Scout can continue to earn merit badges and be rewarded with an Eagle Palm for each 5 additional merit badges. He can also continue to lead and guide the troop or he can change his focus to helping Cub Scouts become Boy Scouts. He may become a Junior Assistant ScoutMaster, helping the ScoutMaster with projects to improve the troop. Or, he can look for worthwhile endeavors outside of scouting to which he can apply his scouting background. There are many ways an Eagle Scout can continue to contribute to and receive from the Scouting program.